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Our Mission

MidPenn Legal Services is a non-profit, public interest law firm that provides high quality free civil legal services to low-income residents and survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault in 18 counties in Central Pennsylvania.
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Coronavirus Response

HOW TO APPLY FOR LEGAL HELP DURING COVID-19

 

Our Impact in Fiscal Year 2019-2020

  • People Helped

    15,334

  • Cases Handled

    9,168

  • Economic Benefit $

    2,564,880

  • Advocate Hours

    97,876

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News & Notes

To lead a fulfilled life, being healthy is about much more than just the physical. It involves your mental well-being, too. 

Central Penn Business Journal - Central Penn Business Journal has selected 45 women for its 2021 Women of Influence awards.

The award honors high-achieving women for their career accomplishments. The honorees are selected based on their professional experience, community involvement, leadership and sustained commitment to mentoring.

Circle of Excellence honorees are women of longstanding, notable success in the community who are leading the way for other women.

CPBJ added a new category this year, “Women to Watch,” which honors women leaders 35 or younger who demonstrate outstanding professional accomplishments, community involvement and commitment to positive change.

To be eligible for the awards, candidates must live or work in the central Pennsylvania area, which includes Adams, Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, Perry, and York counties.

“The 2021 Women of Influence honorees are extremely accomplished,” said Suzanne Fischer-Huettner, group publisher of Central Penn Business Journal. “They are innovators, creators and mentors who inspire others with service to their professions and to their communities. “They mentor and pave the way for future generations of women leaders. Central Penn Business Journal is pleased to honor them.”

Republican Herald - Ombudsman is a Swedish word which means “citizen representative,” a somewhat ambiguous title for an important role. According to the dictionary, an ombudsman is a person who investigates and attempts to resolve complaints and problems between those receiving a service and those providing it, among other things. We all know someone directly or indirectly who has received long-term care of some sort, such as in a nursing home, personal care home, assisted living facility or adult daycare. A long-term care ombudsman is a trained individual who advocates on behalf of people who receive long-term care services. The state Department of Aging states that the mission of the Ombudsman Program is to “advocate for those who can’t, support those who can and ensure all long-term care consumers live with dignity and respect.” The Ombudsman Program includes volunteers who visit long-term care facilities to keep an eye out for residents’ well-being and concerns.

What does an Ombudsman do?

• Provides information to residents and family about rights, procedures and additional resources within the facility or community.

• Investigates concerns and works to resolve issues that may involve a resident.

• Offers education programs and carries out training for facility staff.

• Assists in the development of resident and family councils.

During the pandemic, this program has been suspended for the well-being of long-term care residents and of volunteers. However, the program is gearing up to resume, and many volunteers are needed. Training is required and is offered free of charge and online.

If you are interested in learning more, call Eileen Barlow at MidPenn Legal Services, 570-622-3931, ext. 3304, or email ebarlow@midpenn.org.